Last edited by Zulugis
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Performance of the U.S. railroads since World War II found in the catalog.

Performance of the U.S. railroads since World War II

Kent T. Healy

Performance of the U.S. railroads since World War II

a quarter century of private operation.

by Kent T. Healy

  • 104 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Vantage Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Railroads -- United States -- History -- 20th century.,
    • United States -- Economic conditions -- 1945-

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 287-295.

      Other titlesPerformance of the United States railroads since World War II.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHE2751 .H33 1985
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 295 p. :
      Number of Pages295
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3196478M
      ISBN 100533065615
      LC Control Number83090465

      A Short History of U.S. Freight Railroads Page 1 of 5 Summary Since their birth nearly years ago, railroads have played a crucial role in America’s development. They grew rapidly in the decades up to World War I. Following the war, growing competition from highways and waterways and increasingly stringent regulation led toFile Size: KB. Railroads remain under private control during World War II and move on average twice the monthly volume of both freight and passengers as during World War I. – Railroads enter the postwar era with a new sense of optimism that leads them to invest billions of dollars in new locomotives, freight equipment, and passenger trains.

        Rationing in the U.S. During World War II The Second World War but they became more expensive since they were not subject to price controls. To get a classification and a book . The Santa Fe Railroad barged rail cars across the San Francisco Bay for much of the 20th century as there is no direct rail link to the San Francisco peninsula. In the post World War II period a fleet of three tugs moved the barges: the Paul P. Hastings, the Edward J. Engel, and the John R. cross-bay float service had ended and the tugs had been sold, the Hastings sank off Point.

        The diesel-burning locomotive, the workhorse of American railroads since World War II, will soon begin burning natural gas — a potentially historic shift that could cut fuel costs, reduce. Before World War II, freight cars consisted almost entirely of four basic types: the semiwalled open car, the fully covered boxcar, the flatcar, and the tank then, railroads and car builders have developed a wide range of car types designed specifically for the ideal handling and competitive transport of individual goods or commodities.


Share this book
You might also like
Classification of Rural Housing Markets in England

Classification of Rural Housing Markets in England

Cooking for one

Cooking for one

The laws of slavery in Texas

The laws of slavery in Texas

Two and a tail

Two and a tail

Red paper.

Red paper.

A study of Federal immigration policies and practices in Southern California

A study of Federal immigration policies and practices in Southern California

Old bank notes

Old bank notes

Octopus

Octopus

A young wife

A young wife

Diagnosing human relations in organisations

Diagnosing human relations in organisations

Courts Bill [HL]

Courts Bill [HL]

A touch-stone of grace

A touch-stone of grace

Almost a woman.

Almost a woman.

That Was Then, Ruseurrection Timeàthis Is Now

That Was Then, Ruseurrection Timeàthis Is Now

Eighteenth-century poetry.

Eighteenth-century poetry.

Performance of the U.S. railroads since World War II by Kent T. Healy Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a wonderful pictorial review of the U.S. railroads during World War II. Tells about the part the railroads played in the movement of men and materials, the efforts and cooperation of the railroads during these trying times following the Depression.4/5(4). Performance of the U.S. railroads since World War II book Citation | Performance of the U.

Railroads since World War II: A Quarter Century of Private Operation. By Kent T. Healy. (New York: Vantage Press, vii + pp. Maps, charts Author: Albro Martin. In comparison to the "Great War," railroads were far better prepared for World War II's traffic onslaught. In Don DeNevi published a wonderful book entitled, "America's Fighting Railroads: A World War II Pictorial History." In over pages he provides an in-depth look at just how vital they were to the war effort through numerous statistics, detailed text, and historic photos.

Despite the difficulties, American railroads and railroaders had a profound impact on the war effort. This book is the story of the unpreparedness of the railroads for an unprecedented war, the government takeover to ensure safety and peak operating efficiency, and the subsequent relinquishment of the railroads with the groundbreaking Transportation Act of /5(2).

Every economic downturn since World War II has been precipitated by nose-diving freight traffic. There have also been periods such as. The decades after the Civil War were a great age of railroad building. Total rail mileage in the United States grew f miles in to just undermiles at the turn of the century, with most of the new track being laid east of the Mississippi River in the nation's industrial heartland.

Since the end of World War II Frank Richter has "worked with the railroad." and intensively in pursuit of the transformation of the railroad that is the subject of this was with the end of the war that he left the Service with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as an editor in its Publications resulted in starting the publication Modern Railroads, along with David R.

Records Relating to the U.S. Military Railroads During the Civil War SummerVol. 43, No. 2 By David A. Pfeiffer Enlarge As General McCallum s assistant, Herman Haupt preferred being out in the field, and he worked magic in reconstructing bridges and keeping the trains running on time.

(B) Herman Haupt was not to be stopped. He was an industrious man, a skilled. Railroads of the present era are seeing a renaissance of freight traffic not experienced since World War II.

Freight ton-miles have more than doubled since the mids with railroads hauling 43% (the most) of all transportation types, and freight revenue reached $57 billion in Afterwards, these electrified rapid transit systems quickly declined and were all but obliterated by the Great Depression.

With World War I's outbreak in mid-summer,railroads dealt with an increasing volume of traffic as supplies for U.S. allies flowed towards, and out of, eastern seaports. Get this from a library.

Performance of the U.S. railroads since World War II: a quarter century of private operation. [Kent T Healy]. The Great Railroad Revolution is a history of trains in the United States from their beginnings to the present day.

The author, Christian Wolmar, also provides some background information about railroads in Britain early in the book, because steam trains originated in that country/5. So at the end of“the Railroads War Board and railroad managers in general appealed to the federal government to run American railroads as one large system.”.

On December 26 President Wilson issued a proclamation giving control to the federal government. Prof. Daniels traces the history of the new United States Railroad Administration through the end of the war and beyond. Though not officially at war, the nation was definitely on a war footing. Railroad traffic increased as the armed forces rebuilt.

A freight car shortage occurred in late for the first time sinceand the railroads worked steadily to put long-dormant cars and locomotives back in service. While the U.S. overall growth rate may be much slower than that following the end of World War II, it is nevertheless growing.

Figure 7 is a FreightWaves SONAR graph showing the current carload rail freight volume as we approached December Important to note is that volumes now are below that of both and as the year ends. Stover describes the growth of the railroads' monopoly, with the consequent need for state and federal regulations; relates the vital part played by the railroads during the Civil War and the two World Wars; and charts the railroads' decline due.

World War II would prove to be the zenith of public rail transportation. More people and materials than ever before had to travel, and nearly everything moved by rail. Demand increased spectacularly. Insteam railroads handledmillion ton-miles: about 62 percent of all freight. This nearly doubled by toton-miles.

Sadly, as the 20th century progressed trains lost their luster and during the post-World War II period many lines were abandoned. In some cases, entire trunk lines were severed including Erie Lackawanna's route to Chicago, Milwaukee Road's Pacific Coast Extension, and Pennsylvania Railroad's "Panhandle Route" to St.

Louis among the more notable. This article is part of the history of rail transport by country series. Wooden railroads, called wagonways, were built in the United States starting from the s.

A railroad was reportedly used in the construction of the French fortress at Louisburg, Nova Scotia, in New France (now Canada) in Between andat the close of the French and Indian War (–), a gravity. American history and world history can be found at historycental- History's home on the web.

Explore our complete time lines of major events in American history as well as World History. Research our special sections on diverse subjects ranging from presidential elections to naval history. Alexandria, Virginia, Shops of the U.S. Military Railroads.

A close look at an important Civil War railroad facility. John H. White, Jr. The Last Train Ride: Repatriating the remains of America's World War II dead.

James I. Murrie and Naomi Jeffey Petersen Gordon Parks' Images of Washington Union Station.Southern Pacific. By the s, the original Transcontinental Railroad main line around the north end of the Great Salt Lake had fulfilled its original purpose of connecting the eastern United States with California, and was now needed for World War II.

Specifically, the U.S. war effort needed the Transcontinental Railroad's steel rails.By the eve of World War II, automobiles, large buses, trucks, planes, and pipelines — supported by government subsidies and less burdened by regulation than railroads — have become full-fledged competitors to railroads.

Future U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall works as a railroad porter during the summers.